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Biographical entry Hitchcock, Warren Billingsley (1919 - 1984)

Born
18 December 1919
Sydney, New South Wales, Australia
Died
16 March 1984
Occupation
Ornithologist

Summary

Warren Billingsley Hitchcock worked in museums in South Australia, Tasmania and Victoria. He was Secretary, Birdbanding Scheme, CSIRO Wildlife Survey Section (later Division of Wildlife and Ecology), Canberra 1957-1966, then Curator of the Division's ornithological collections from 1967 until his retirement in 1970.

Details

Born Ashfield, New South Wales, 18 December 1919. Died Auckland, New Zealand, 16 March 1984. Educated Universities of Adelaide (Zoology and Geology to 1940) and Tasmania (1946-49, but did not graduate). War service in the Citizen Military Forces and Australian Imperial Forces in the Northern Territory, New Guinea and New Britain 1940-45, reaching the rank of Lieutenant in the LHQ Cipher Replacement Section; Scientific Cadet, South Australian Museum 1938; Temporary Assistant in Zoology, Tasmanian Museum 1945-46; Ornithologist, National Museum of Victoria 1949-54; Field Biologist, Animal Industry Branch, Northern Territory Administration, Alice Springs 1954-57; Secretary, Birdbanding Scheme, CSIRO Wildlife Survey Section (later Division of Wildlife and Ecology), Canberra 1957-66, Curator of the Division's ornithological collections 1967 until retirement in 1970, after which he took little part in ornithological matters for some years. Enrolled in the Department of Anthropology, Auckland University ca 1979 and again became active in ornithological circles. President, Royal Australasian Ornithologists Union 1962-63 and editor of The Emu 1962-65; helped to found the Canberra Ornithologists Group 1964. A great field ornithologist with a particular interest in terns.

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See also

  • Robin, Libby, The Flight of the Emu: a Hundred Years of Australian Ornithology 1901-2001, Melbourne University Press, Melbourne, 2001, 492 pp. Details

Rosanne Walker