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Biographical entry Sullivan, John Vincent (Jack) (1924 - 2013)

Born
1924
Rockhampton, Queensland, Australia
Died
2013
Melbourne, Victoria, Australia
Occupation
Physicist

Summary

Jack Sullivan was a physicist whose principal areas of work were in vacuum UV and atomic absorption spectroscopy, particularly sputtered vapours, and lamp development. At the CSIRO Division of Chemical Industry (later Chemical Physics), he was instrumental in the development of sealed hollow-cathode lamps, an essential source of atomic line spectra used in chemical analysis by atomic absorption spectroscopy. The 'boosted output' hollow-cathode lamps he developed with Alan Walsh in 1962 were patented and produced commercially for many years. Sullivan and Walsh also developed the technique of 'selective modulation' and used it to construct 'resonance detectors' which enabled atomic absorption analyses to be carried out without the need for a monochromator. For his research in spectroscopy Sullivan was awarded the David Syme Research Prize. He combined his scientific role in CSIRO with providing technical assistance for international scientific instrument makers. In retirement Sullivan worked as a consultant until 2007.

Details

Events

1949
Education - MSc, University of Queensland
1950 - 1984
Career position - Research scientist, CSIRO Division of Chemical Industry (later Chemical Physics)
1968
Award - David Syme Research Prize, University of Melbourne
1984
Life event - Retired

Published resources

Journal Articles

  • Swingler, A. L. and Willis, J. B., 'John Vincent Sullivan 1924 - 2013', Australian Physics, vol. 51, no. 5, 2014, p. 170. Details

Helen Cohn